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SEPTEMBER /
OCTOBER 2004

 

     
 


THE ROLLING STONES

 
THE KINKS


THE ZOMBIES

JETHRO TULL

THE FACES

THE JOHN ENTWISTLE BAND
 
     
  THE ROLLING STONES
Singles 1965-1967
(Abkco)

When it came to releasing monumental hit singles back in the ‘60s, few groups, save The Beatles, could touch the Stones. Having already released their classic ‘60s albums as hybrid Stereo / SACD releases, Abkco have recently been busy reviving all those great Rolling Stones singles on CD on a series of vintage style box sets complete with original 45 cover art and historic liner notes. Last year the label began the process with Singles 1963-1965, which featured the Stones’ early R&B and blues releases and now they get to the heart of the matter with The Rolling Stones Singles 1965-1967. Let’s face it—as great as the band’s early single releases are, they really didn’t hit their stride till the 1965 release of “Satisfaction”—the single release kicking off the 11 CD 1965-1967 set. The Stones ‘60s singles always featured an A and a B side, yet here, the three track “Satisfaction” single incorporates both the American and British b-sides. Restoring some of the greatest ‘60s chart topping pop music ever caught on record, this second Stones singles box on Abkco is supported by an extensive booklet featuring revealing quotes from Mick Jagger, Bill Wyman, Keith Richards and more. A stunning box set to behold, these eleven singles decked out in their original picture sleeves is essential for any devoted ‘60s pop fan and is a perfect set up for the third Stones singles box, entitled Singles 1968-1971, coming soon on Abkco. www.abkco.com

 


 
  THE KINKS
The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society
(Sanctuary / Castle)

It was at the height of that incredibly prolific period in his songwriting history that Ray Davies created a magnum opus of ‘60s rock that is listed by many Kinks fans as being their best album ever. From his introductory liner notes about the album, The Who’s Pete Townshend is quoted as saying, “For me, Village Green Preservation Society is Ray’s masterwork. It’s his Sgt. Pepper, it’s what makes him the definitive pop poet laureate.” What better way to celebrate that landmark album than with Sanctuary’s 2004 three CD box set of The Kinks Are The Village Green Preservation Society. Released during the same late Fall ‘68 period as The Beatles (white album), Beggar’s Banquet and the second Traffic album, VGPS may have been initially overlooked, yet within days, word quickly spread of The Kinks’ innovative masterpiece. From the lengthy liner notes, Ray states, “I just wanted to be creative and say something about a part of the world that was not so commercial.” Also from the extensive booklet, group bassist Pete Quaife is quoted as saying “It’s the best album we made” with group guitarist Dave Davies recalling “it was a project that was either ahead of it’s time, or just totally out of time!” With disc 1 featuring the complete 15 track stereo mix (+four bonus tracks), disc 2 featuring the complete mono mix (+five bonus tracks) and disc 3 showcasing 22 certified Kinks rarities and vital alternate tracks, one of the greatest ‘60s albums is fittingly showcased on the pedestal it so richly deserves. www.kindakinks.net

 



 
 

THE ZOMBIES
Odessey & Oracle
(Fuel 2000)

One album I sometimes associate with the Zombies classic, Odessey & Oracle is Days Of Future Past, by The Moody Blues. Both albums spawned huge post release hit singles—“Nights In White Satin” by The Moodies and “Time Of The Season”, the big Zombies hit off Odessey. Hard to believe that without the intervention of Blues Project founder Al Kooper, O&O might not have ever been released in the U.S., although it did finally on Columbia’s Date imprint. While The Moodies used their album as a stepping stone to greatness, The Zombies imploded after their release, with leader Rod Argent and his songwriting partner Chris White splitting from singer Colin Blunstone, moving on to form Argent in 1970. It was a shame that The Zombies split after the Lp, as the single got so big way after the fact. Nevertheless, Odessey & Oracle remains one of the greatest U.K. pop albums from that magical mid-1968 heyday. Fuel 2000 revive the evergreen pop classic on their 2004 remaster complete with nine bonus tracks, attaching the expert reissue notes from noted author and pop culture historian Greg Russo as well as Al Kooper’s brilliant original Lp notes. www.fuel2000.com


 
  JETHRO TULL
Stormwatch
(Capitol / EMI)

Jethro Tull made such an enormous musical impact back in the ‘60s, so much in fact that many groups throughout the continent began playing Tull-like instrumental gothic-rock sounds around that time including Jan Akkerman and Focus, whose sound is interestingly quite Tull inspired. Although Tull mania sort of ended with the onset of their watermark double disc, Living In The Past or more likely with the ‘73 release of Passion Play, the band continued making new fans and delighting original Tull buffs by actually recording some depth-defying sounds till the demise of the ‘70s. The final Tull studio album of the ‘70s, 1979’s Stormwatch really captured the last gasp of the quintessential ‘70s Tull sound. Interestingly, in his liner notes for this 2004 EMI remaster of Stormwatch, Ian Anderson dedicates the reissue to drummer Barrie Barlow, who left the fold following Stormwatch after so many ground-breaking Tull albums. The album’s pensive, apprehensive outlook was further exacerbated by the untimely illness and ultimate passing of bassist John Glascock, who left the sessions after three tracks. Four bonus tracks include a mythical Tull instrumental entitled “King Henry’s Madrigal”, of course featuring the great Martin Barre on guitar. Top remastered sound and those fine bonus tracks further decorate this underrated Tull classic. On another note, Capitol / Chrysalis have also reissued upgraded CDs of A, the CD repackaged with a live in concert DVD showcasing the A lineup of Anderson, Barre, bassist Dave Pegg, keyboardist Eddie Jobson and drummer Mark Craney featuring a variety of live and concept video footage. Anderson laments in the notes about the demise of the classic Tull lineup with Barlow, Evan and David Palmer and the A CD and DVD clearly reflect a change of direction into the realm of techno-druid music, the first of more to come. Finally, Capitol / Chrysalis have reissued the original Tull Bursting Out album in 2004 as a double CD set. Recorded on the 1978 Tull European tour, the set features the classic late ‘70s Tull line-up performing a veritable smorgasbord of long standing Tull favorites from 1969’s Stand Up to Heavy Horses in 1978, topped off with twelve pages of photos and priceless notes from Ian Anderson.
www.j-tull.com

 


 
  THE FACES
Five Guys Walk Into A Bar...
(WSM / Rhino)

After their band folded, Rod Stewart and Ron Wood went on to even greater successes, though not alot is said these days about their extensive Warner Bros. Records repertoire with The Faces. The early ‘70s rock legends—honored in 2004 with the release of a four CD box set entitles Five Guys Walk Into A Bar—actually evolved out of the ‘60s mod pop group The Small Faces, an innovative U.K. band that counted gifted bassist /songwriter Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones (drums) and Ian McLagen (keys) among it’s ranks. From the liner notes Wood adds, “When Rod and I were in Beck’s group, our favorite band was The Small Faces. They were so fantastic, with so much energy...” Key to the Small Faces mod-pop sound was the late great Steve Marriott, who left to form Humble Pie and nearly 30 years later the tale of both The Faces and Humble Pie is legendary. Featuring songwriting contributions from all and Stewart’s patented vocals going full tilt, The Faces gave the Stones a run for their money till they split in ‘75. WSM/Rhino have done a fabulous job on their four CD box set decking it with innovative packaging design, numerous essays and the offbeat post-production work by Mr. McLagen. www.wsm-us.com


 
  THE JOHN ENTWISTLE BAND
Live
(Image Entertainment)

In his eulogy for founding Who bassist John Entwistle drummer Steve Luongo wrote, “He did for the bass what Jimi Hendrix did for the guitar and there isn’t a bassist alive today that hasn’t felt the everlasting effect of John Entwistle.” Unexpectedly dropping dead in Las Vegas at the onset of the Who’s North American tour in June of 2002, John Entwistle left behind a repertoire of music ripe for rediscovery by future generations of pop fans. His bass work and songs on his solo albums and classic Who albums such as Who Are You and Who By Numbers is legendary and the master of the musical macabre leaves his signature with the posthumous release of The John Entwistle Band: Live. A 2004 DVD release on Image Entertainment, Live features a rockin’ live performance from Entwistle & company in a magical evening outdoor concert setting in 1999. Entwistle and band—Steve Luongo on drums, guitar ace Godfrey Townsend and Gordon Cotten on keyboards—are in stellar form here, serving up choice covers of Entwistle classics like “Horror Rock”, “Had Enough” and “Trick Of The Light” along with fresh covers of Who classics like “The Real Me” and “Shakin’ All Over”. Rounding it out, the expertly filmed DVD blends in a touching eulogy—complete with rare video footage of the bass great at home and in the studio—as well as a concert-only option and multiple audio options. John Entwistle chose his musical company wisely over the years and Luongo, Townsend and Cotten champion his legacy on this DVD concert classic. www.image-entertainment.com / www.JohnEntwistle.com


 

 

 
 
 
   
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